1170 E. Belvidere Rd. Suite #106
Grayslake, IL 60030

Phone: 847-548-7337

Fax: 847-548-9909

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Posts for category: Children's Health

By Mundelein Pediatrics
November 26, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Asthma  

Is your child having trouble breathing? Discover the warning signs of asthma.

Do you notice that your child seems particularly out of breath or strains to breathe after playing outside? Does your child get tired easily or Asthmado you notice them coughing more often? Asthma is one of the most common chronic childhood disorders and it’s time to talk to one of our Grayslake, IL, pediatricians at at Mundelein Pediatrics right away if your baby or child is displaying one or more of these symptoms,

  • A persistent cough that may be exacerbated by exercise
  • A cough that is worse at night
  • A whistling or wheezing sound when your child breathes
  • Gasping for air or using their body to breathe (e.g. shrugging their shoulders)
  • Rapid or fast breathing
  • Complaining of a tight chest

While you may not want to panic or worry yourself over nothing, if you notice that your child has trouble breathing or is acting unusual they should absolutely be seen by a doctor as soon as possible. Don’t be afraid to let our receptionist know what’s going on with your child and the symptoms they are experiencing. Knowing that your child could be dealing with a potentially serious problem ensures that they get the immediate care they need.

 

Signs of an Emergency

It’s also important to recognize the signs that your child may be having an asthma attack. In this case, you should call 911 rather than seeing a pediatrician if you notice,

  • Your child’s ribs stick out
  • They are sucking their tummy in to help them breathe
  • They can’t finish sentences because they are having trouble catching their breath

 

Treating Asthma

While there isn’t a cure for childhood asthma, our Grayslake, IL, children’s doctors can work with you or you to determine the right treatment plan to manage your child’s symptoms. This usually involves avoiding or limiting exposure to triggers such as,

  • Cold weather
  • Viral infections (e.g. cold)
  • Smoke and pollutants
  • Allergies (e.g. pollen; mold; pet dander)
  • Exercise

Since there are certain triggers that can’t be avoided completely (e.g. exercise) it’s also important that your child can manage their symptoms through regular medication. There are two main types of asthma medication: long-term control and quick-relief. The control medication is used every day to reduce airway inflammation while the quick-relief medication is used only when symptoms of an attack appear.

 

If you are concerned that your child might have asthma then it’s time to call Mundelein Pediatrics in Grayslake, IL at (847) 548-7337 to schedule an evaluation.

By Jennifer Devaney, M.D.
July 02, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Child Care   Physical Exam  

Once your child is born it’s amazing just how quickly they grow and develop. It seems like you blink and suddenly they are talking and walking. During these important milestones it’s also important to have a pediatrician that you turn to regularly to make sure that these developmental milestones are being met and that your child is healthy. After all, if there are any problems you want to find out as soon as possible when early medical interventions can make all the difference.

From the moment your child is born until 2 years old, your pediatrician will most likely want to see them every six months for wellness check ups. After your child turns 2 years old you should still bring them in once a year for a routine physical exam and preventive care. Along with checking your child’s vital signs and monitoring their height and weight your pediatrician will also check hearing, eyesight, respiration, cardiac activity and reflexes.

A physical exam will check all systems of your child’s body to make sure that everything is functioning properly. If your child’s doctor does detect a problem it can be treated immediately. Along with a physical exam your child will also undergo any additional screenings and vaccinations that are necessary for maintaining optimal health.

Furthermore, your pediatrician can also recommend workout routines and appropriate physical activity for your child based on their current health and lifestyle, as well as recommendations on diet, sleeping habits and even their emotional and behavioral health. Even if a pediatrician won’t be able to fully treat all conditions they can still refer your child to a specialist who will be able to handle a specific health problem or injury.

Once a child is old enough to go to school it’s also important that parents schedule their child’s sports physical so that they can participate in physical activity and school sports. An annual sports physical can detect past injuries and other problems that could affect your child’s ability to participate in certain activities.

These physical exams are often mandatory before a child can play school sports; however, even if it isn’t mandatory you should still bring your child in once a year for a comprehensive sports physical to make sure that they are healthy enough for certain physical activity.

Make sure your child is seeing their pediatrician regularly for care, not just when they are sick but also to ward away infections and other health problems. Schedule your child’s next physical exam today.

By Jennifer Devaney, M.D.
June 04, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Sports Injuries  

Your child's sports injury can be treated just as your injury was. Or, can it? Your pediatrician knows that a child's body is still developing, responding differently to acute and overuse injuries from organized sports, gym class, and more. As such, he or she can help your child avoid injury and in the event of sprain, strain, laceration, dislocation, or head injury, will help your youngster recover and stay healthy.

Kids sports injuries

They're very common, says the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Annually, 3.5 million American children under the age of 14 suffer significant sports injuries. Some injuries are related to poor conditioning. Others occur because of inadequate instruction or proper protective gear such as padding, eye wear, sneakers, dance shoes, skates, and cleats.

In addition, diligent supervision on the part of parents, coaches, teachers, and other well-informed adults is critical to safe play. Well-maintained game fields and indoor surfaces avoid foot, ankle, and knee injuries.

Finally, KidsHealth reports that Pre-participation Physicals review medical histories and spot possible weaknesses in children's physiology and anatomy. Most school and organized sports teams require these check-ups either with the school physician or the family pediatrician before the sports season commences.

Treating sports injuries

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) states that proper assessment and prompt treatment of kids' sports injuries prevent long-term problems, including pain and proper growth of areas of the body such as the long bones. Traditionally, coaches and parents have used the RICE protocol to stabilize and injury, relieve pain, and begin the healing process. It still works exceptionally well. RICE stands for:

  • Rest
  • Ice to the affected area
  • Compression with an elastic bandage
  • Elevation of the affected limb/injured area above heart level

Then, your pediatrician and other health care providers can devise a specific treatment plan to include physical therapy, strengthening exercises, over the counter analgesics, braces, and casts as needed. As a parent, you know your child well. So be sure to fully participate in your youngster's care plan.

Be safe, be well

Each child responds differently to athletic training depending on his or her gender, size, age, physical conditioning, underlying health issue,s and natural ability. You and your pediatrician can partner together in encouraging a safe sports season for your child. That's a win-win situation.

By Mundelein Pediatrics
April 12, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Immunizations  

Has your child received all of their immunizations? Offered by your child's Grayslake, IL, pediatricians, immunizations not only protect yourimmunizations son or daughter from developing serious childhood diseases, but they also help prevent the spread of disease in the larger community. Read on to learn more!

Are immunizations really necessary?

The Anti-Vaxx movement has been in the news lately as the country has been increasingly experiencing outbreaks of measles, mumps, and whooping cough. Although these diseases had been largely eradicated in the past, they're returning due to the reluctance of some parents to vaccinate their children.

These parents argue that the diseases are relatively minor and won't result in any lasting harm. Unfortunately, that's not always the case. Your child will be miserable and uncomfortable if they contract measles, chicken pox, whooping cough, or another childhood disease, even if the case is mild. At worst, they will face serious complications, like pneumonia, breathing difficulties, serious skin or blood infections, or encephalitis (swelling of the brain.) Some unlucky children will even die.

Some parents have avoided immunizing their children in the past due to concerns about a possible increase in autism in immunized children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, numerous research studies have found no link between immunizations and autism.

Immunizations protect everyone, not just your children. Some children and adults can't receive immunizations due to certain medical conditions, while very young children may not have received all of their shots yet. Vaccinating your child prevents the spread of disease and protects unvaccinated people.

Which immunizations should my child receive?

During a visit to our Grayslake office, your pediatrician will discuss with you the recommended immunization schedule for your child. Common immunizations include those that protect your son or daughter from:

  • Polio
  • Chickenpox
  • Hepatitis A and B
  • Human Papillomavirus
  • Influenza
  • Measles, Mumps, and Rubella
  • Pneumonia
  • Meningitis
  • Rotavirus
  • Diptheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis
  • Haemophilus Influenzae Type B

Safeguard your child's health with immunizations. Call your Grayslake, IL, pediatricians at (847) 548-7337 to make an appointment for your son or daughter!

By Mundelein Pediatrics
November 16, 2018
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Immunizations   Vaccinations  

The importance of immunizations

Childhood immunizations are one of the most important safeguards against communicable diseases and their serious, long-term complications. Your pediatrician closely adheres to the vaccination schedules published by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Why? Well, there's nothing more important than your youngster's health and well-being, and immunizations effectively guard them.

Just what is an immunization?

Most immunizations are given as "shots," or injections, but some, such as the Rotavirus vaccine, are oral medications. However administered, vaccines boost your child's immune system in its battle against diseases which easily spread from person to person.

Each vaccine contains a small amount of a killed or weakened micro-organisms. These altered viruses or bacteria raise the body's defenses against a particular illness such as chicken pox. pneumonia, polio, tetanus, and more...up to 14 in all by time your child is two years old, says the CDC.

Are immunizations necessary?

Your pediatrician, his or her colleagues and decades of research prove that vaccines protect the health of individual children and of the community at large. Also called herd immunity, community immunity works best when as many babies and youngsters receive all their "shots" on schedule. Community immunity protects youngsters who cannot receive vaccines because of cancer treatment, HIV infection or other serious reason. It also shields the general population when people travel from countries which cannot provide access to these important medications.

Both the AAP and the CDC publish and recommend set vaccine schedules carried out at well-baby and well-child visits at the doctor's office. In addition, there is a "catch-up" schedule for children who have begun their immunizations late or had them interrupted by illness or other serious concern.

Your pediatrician's services

They're so important. Your child's doctor keeps your child's immunization records and can distribute them to schools, camps, college, sports, daycare and other organizations who require proof of up-to-date vaccines. The doctor also monitors your child for any adverse reactions, although typically, vaccines produce no more than:

  • Localized redness and soreness at the injection site
  • Low grade fever
  • Pain and swelling
  • Fussiness
Partner with your child's physician
 
He or she provides the preventive care your youngster needs for a healthy life. Examinations and immunizations are just parts of the comprehensive services your family receives when you go to your local pediatrician.